Saturday September 21, 2019

SKY ISLAND

A celebration of true Texas trail running at a truly unique venue.

Registration opens on and closes on

Overview

Both races start at the historic Indian Lodge and offer challenging climbs and descents on technical terrain. The 25k course is a single loop contained entirely within Davis Mountains State Park. The 50k course runs the entirety of the Davis Mountains State Park trail system with an additional excursion into the Fort Davis National Historic Site.

Registration

50K

06:00 AM (CDT)

Saturday September 21, 2019

25K

07:00 AM (CDT)

Saturday September 21, 2019

Schedule


50k

Racer Check-in: 5:00 - 5:45

Race Brief: 5:45

Race Start: 6:00

25k

Racer Check-in: 6:30 - 7:15

Race Brief: 7:15

Race Start: 7:30

Lunch

10:00 am - 1:00 pm

Awards

We will host award ceremonies as all podium finishers for a given race come in.

Cutoff

10:30am @ Park Entrance (mile 16) (~16:46/mile pace)

Sunrise @ 7:45 am    Sunset @ 7:50 pm

Details

Location

Davis Mountains State Park - TX-118, Fort Davis, TX 79734

Parking

  • Indian Lodge guests park at Indian Lodge.
  • Campsite guests park at campsites.
  • Race day arrivals follow parking attendants. Race day parking is in Campgrounds 62-94,
  • Overflow parking: follow parking attendants to the park maintenance facilities across from Indian Lodge.

Park Entrance Fees

Park entrance fees are covered for all race participants. Spectators must pay their own entry fee. You can pay for spectator entry fees on the Texas State Park's reservation system and print your park pass prior to leaving for the race. This will speed your entry into the park.

Race Rules

  • No pacers allowed
  • Every 50k racer MUST start with a light, as you will run in the dark for the first 90 minutes of the race.
  • Every racer MUST start with a water carrier. You must either have at least one water bottle or a hydration vest/hydration pack.

10 Essentials

Although all our courses are excellently marked, you can never predict what can happen during a race. We recommend learning about the 10 essentials for backcountry safety and bringing them in your running pack. Learn more about the 10 essentials in this article by North Shore Rescue.

Aid Stations and Drop Bags

For 50k runners, drop bags can be left at the Park Entrance Aid Station (mile 16.1). Aid stations are available at the following locations and mile marks:

Aid Station
Mile Marker
Sky Line Ridge -3.5
Sky Line Ridge -
6.6
Sky Line Ridge -
10.7
Sky Line Ridge -
13.8
Park Entrance -16.1
Primitive Loop -18.7
Primitive Loop -24.3
Park Entrance -26.8

Courses

The 25k course heads straight of the park from the start at Indian Lodge to ascend the Limpia Creek Trail and circumnavigate the Sheep Pen Canyon Loop Trail (the portion of the course on the north side of Hwy 118 is also known as the Primitive Loop). After completing Sheep Pen Canyon Loop, the course descends the Limpia Creek Trail, re-enters the park, and jumps on the Headquarters Trail. The Headquarters Trail leads to the Montezuma Quail Trail where the course immediately starts to ascend the gnarliest and steepest climb of the race. Beware the false summits! Once the course crests the Montezuma Quail Trail, it follows the Indian Lodge Trail back to the Start/Finish with a treacherous descent on loose rock (the portion of the course after re-entering the park is also known as the Indian Lodge Loop).

The 50k course starts from Indian Lodge and heads directly for the Skyline Drive Trail. This is the first major climb on the 50k race course. At the end of the Skyline Drive Trail, you pass through a rock cut to find the first aid station (mile 3.5). From the aid station, you take the Fort Access Trail to descend into Fort Davis National Historic site. Once the National Historic Site, follow the North Ridge Trail to the Tall Grass Loop to the Hospital Canyon Trail. You will climb out of Fort Davis via Hospital Canyon and return to the Skyline Ridge Aid Station (mile 6.6). From the Skyline Ridge Aid Station, you descend the Old CCC Trail to return to the start of the Skyline Drive Trail. Skyline Drive to Fort Davis to Old CCC to Skyline Drive comprises the Skyline Ridge Loop. All 50k runners must complete back-to-back laps of the Skyline Ridge Loop.

After completing your second lap of the Skyline Ridge Loop, all 50k runners exit the park and cross under Hwy 118 to run what we call the Primitive Loop. After crossing under Hwy 118, the course traverses Limpia Creek and then ascends the Limpia Creek Trail and circumnavigates the Sheep Pen Canyon Loop Trail (the portion of the course on the north side of Hwy 118 is the Primitive Loop). After completing the Sheep Pen Canyon Loop, the course descends the Limpia Creek Trail, re-enters the park, and jumps on the Headquarters Trail. The Headquarters Trail will lead you to the Montezuma Quail Trail where you will immediately start to ascend the gnarliest and steepest climb on the course. Beware the false summits! Once you crest the Montezuma Quail Trail, you follow the Indian Lodge Trail back to the Start/Finish (the portion of the course after re-entering the park is also known as the Indian Lodge Loop).

Photos


Location

Davis Mountains State Park, 2708.9 acres in size, is located in Davis County, four miles northwest of Fort Davis, approximately halfway between Guadalupe Mountains National Park, Carlsbad Caverns, and Big Bend National Park. The original portion of the park was deeded to Texas Parks and Wildlife Department by a local family. Original improvements were accomplished by the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1933; the park has been open to the public in since the late 1930s; formal campground facilities were added in 1967. NATURE OF THE AREA Extremes of altitude averaging 1-mile high produce both plains grasslands and pinyon juniper-oak woodlands. Montezuma quail, usually farther west, are regularly observed in the park. Scattered stands of ponderosa and the more common pinyon pine, mixed with oak and juniper, cover higher elevations. During wet years, the park abounds in wildflowers. Emory and gray oak and one-seed juniper are the most common trees in the park. Emory oak is predominant along Keesey Creek. Scarlet bouvardia, little-leaf leadtree, trompillo, evergreen sumac, fragrant sumac, Apache plum, little walnut, treecholla, Torrey yucca, catclaw acacia, and agarito are conspicuous shrubs, some of which flower abundantly. The Davis Mountains, the most extensive mountain range in Texas, were formed by volcanic activity during the Tertiary geologic period, which began around 65 million years ago. These mountains were named after Jefferson Davis, U.S. Secretary of War and later President of the Confederacy, who ordered the construction of the Fort Davis army post. Most Indian bands passed through the Davis Mountains, although the Mescalero Apaches made seasonal camps. As west Texas settlements increased, raiding in Mexico and along the San Antonio-El Paso Trail became a way of life for Apaches, Kiowas, and Comanches. Few Americans had seen the Davis Mountains prior to 1846. After the war with Mexico, a wave of gold seekers, settlers, and traders came through the area and needed the protection of a military post - Fort Davis. Fort Davis was active from 1854 until 1891, except for certain periods during the Civil War. In 1961, the historic fort ruins were declared a National Historic Site, and a vast restoration/preservation program was initiated by the National Park Service.

Lodging

RESERVATIONS FOR LODGING AT THE HISTORIC INDIAN LODGE ARE FULL!

RESERVATIONS FOR CAMPING ACROSS FROM INDIAN LODGE OPEN MARCH 2019!

Campsites can be booked on a first come, first served basis. Reservations are only available for both Friday and Saturday night, so the prices reflected here include both night's stay plus all applicable taxes and fees. Campsites have water and no electricity. There is one restroom and shower facility in the campground.

Go here to reserve your camping: https://www.spectrumtrailracing.com/sky-island-lodging/campsites